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A Cultural History of Animals

6 Volumes

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      Animals had a ubiquitous and central presence in the ancient world. A Cultural History of Animals In Antiquity presents an extraordinarily broad assessment of animal cultures from 2500 BC to 1000 AD, describing how animals were an intrinsic part of the spiritual life of ancient society, how they were hunted, domesticated and used for entertainment, and the roles animals played in ancient science and philosophy. Since much of what we know about animals in antiquity is gleaned from the images left by our ancestors, the book presents a wealth of illustrations. Seminal ancient narratives about animals - including works from Aristotle, Plutarch, Ovid and Pliny the Elder - are also drawn upon to illustrate contemporary ideas about and attitudes towards animals.

      As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Animals, this volume presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary Symbolism, Hunting, Domestication, Sports and Entertainment, Science, Philosophy, and art.

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      A Cultural History of Animals in the Medieval Age investigates the changing roles of animals in medieval culture, economy and society in the period 1000 to 1400. The period saw significant changes in scientific and philosophical approaches to animals as well as their representation in art.

      Animals were omnipresent in medieval everyday life. They had enormous importance for medieval agriculture and trade and were also hunted for food and used in popular entertainments. At the same time, animals were kept as pets and used to display their owner’s status, whilst medieval religion attributed complex symbolic meanings to animals.

      As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Animals, this volume presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary Symbolism, Hunting, Domestication, Sports and Entertainment, Science, Philosophy, and Art.

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      The Renaissance was an extraordinary period of change in the West, fuelled by changing cultural formations, shifting empires, the growth in exploration, and developments in science and technology. A Cultural History of Animals in the Renaissance presents a broad overview of the changing role of animals in the economy, culture and thinking of the period.

      Covering the period 1400 to 1600, the volume explores a wide range of topics: the symbolic role of birds in early modern writing; hunting rites and animal rights; the domestication of animals; the popularity of performing animals; the development of illustrated works of natural history; changing philosophical views of animal nature; and artistic practice in the visual representation of animals.

      As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Animals, this volume presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary Symbolism, Hunting, Domestication, Sports and Entertainment, Science, Philosophy, and Art.

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      The period of the Enlightenment saw great changes in the way animals were seen. The codifying and categorising impulse of the age of reason saw sharp lines drawn between different animal species and between animals and humans. In 1600, "beasts" were still seen as the foils and adversaries of human reason, By 1800, animals had become exemplars of sentiment and compassion, the new standards of truth and morals. A new age had dawned, a time when humans admired animals and sought to recover their own animality.

      As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Animals, this volume presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary Symbolism, Hunting, Domestication, Sports and Entertainment, Science, Philosophy, and Art.

      Volume 4 in the Cultural History of Animals edited by Linda Kalof and Brigitte Resl.

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      A Cultural History of Animals in the Age of Empire explores the cultural position of animals in the period from 1800 to 1920. This was a time of extraordinary social, political and economic change as the Western world rapidly industrialised and modernised. The Enlightenment had attempted to define the human self; the Age of Empire pulled animals and humans further apart.

      As with all the volumes in the illustrated Cultural History of Animals, this volume presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary Symbolism, Hunting, Domestication, Sports and Entertainment, Science, Philosophy, and Art.

      Volume 5 in the Cultural History of Animals edited by Linda Kalof and Brigitte Resl

      Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008

      Human culture is now more dangerous to nonhuman animals than ever before. The destruction of natural habitats and the killing of animals for food, science, medicine or trophy – sometimes to the point of extinction – is the stuff of newspaper headlines. We live in a time when the idea of an animal’s habitat has almost become irrelevant, except as a historical curiosity, yet also in a time when the public and philosophical acknowledgement of animal rights and environmental ethics is on the rise.

      Animals are enmeshed in human culture simply because people are so interested in them. Animals remain central to our sense of the natural world. Our pets are often seen as our closest companions through life. At the same time, the last century has seen the use of animals in scientific experimentation and the major changes in industrial-scale animal farming. Never has the relationship between human and non-human animals been more hotly contested.