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A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Enlightenment

A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Enlightenment, Volume 4

by Rebecca Probert

Rebecca Probert is Professor of Law at the University of Exeter, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and John Snape

John Snape is Associate Professor of Law at Warwick Law School, University of Warwick, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781474206587
  • ISBN:
    978-1-4742-1285-4 (hardback)

    978-1-4742-1265-6 (set)

    978-1-3500-7926-7 (epdf)

    978-1-3500-7925-0 (epub)

    978-1-4742-0658-7 (online)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2019
A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Enlightenment
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The period of the Enlightenment was marked by innovation in political, cultural, religious, and educational ideas with the aim of improving the experience of human beings in society. Key to intellectual debates and day-to-day life were ideas about the law. Many looked to Britain, and to the British, as exemplars of a state governed by moderate laws under a moderate constitution. Britain’;s laws and constitution were portrayed and satirized in almost every artistic medium. A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Enlightenment presents essays spanning the “long 18th century” (1680 to 1820) which explore the place of law in a range of creative and artistic media, all of which flourished in a commercial society with law at its center and enlightenment as its aim. Drawing upon a wealth of visual and textual sources, A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Enlightenment presents essays that examine key cultural case studies of the period on the themes of justice, constitution, codes, agreements, arguments, property and possession, wrongs, and the legal profession.