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A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Baroque and Enlightenment Age

A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Baroque and Enlightenment Age, Volume 4

by Claire Walker

Claire Walker studied at the University of Western Australia before being appointed to her first academic position at the University of Newcastle, Australia. She has been teaching history at the University of Adelaide since 2007. As an early modernist, Claire teaches courses on early modern European history, heresy and witchcraft, and medieval Europe. She researches the history of religion, society, politics, gender and material culture in 17th and 18th centuries, focusing in particular on exiled communities of English nuns in France and the Southern Netherlands and on the family of Samuel Wesley Senior. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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, Katie Barclay

Katie Barclay is an Associate Professor in the ARC Centre for Excellence in the History of Emotions, and Department of History. She is a graduate in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow, where she completed her undergraduate degree, Masters and PhD. Before joining the University of Adelaide, she held a Research Fellowship in the Institute of Irish Studies, Queen’s University, Belfast. Between 2008 and 2010, she worked as a Research Fellow at the University of Warwick on a project, run jointly with Queen’s, ‘Marriage in Ireland, 1660-1925’. In 2007-8, Dr Barclay was the Economic History Society Anniversary Fellow, held through the Institute of Historical Research, London. She came to Australia as Postdoctoral Fellow in the Centre for the History of Emotions (2011-2014), and subsequently held a Discovery Early Career Award (2014-2017). In 2017-18, Barclay was a EURIAS Marie Curie Fellow at Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies, Aarhus Universitet. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and David Lemmings

David Lemmings was born in London and educated at the Universities of Sussex, London and Oxford before coming to Australia as a Research Fellow of the University of Adelaide in 1987. He then moved to the University of Newcastle in 1990 where he became Head of the Department of History in 1998 and Associate Professor in History in 2000. In 2008, Professor Lemmings moved to the University of Adelaide where he is Professor of History and Leader of the 'Change' research program in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781474207041
  • ISBN:
    978-1-4742-0704-1 (online)

    978-1-4725-3576-4 (hardback)

    978-1-4725-1506-3 (set)

    978-1-3500-9093-4 (epdf)

    978-1-3500-9094-1 (epub)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2019
A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Baroque and Enlightenment Age
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During the period of the Baroque and Enlightenment the word “emotion”, denoting passions and feelings, came into usage, albeit in an irregular fashion. “Emotion” ultimately emerged as a term in its own right, and evolved in English from meaning physical agitation to describe mental feeling. However, the older terminology of “passions” and “affections” continued as the dominant discourse structuring thinking about feeling and its wider religious, political, social, economic, and moral imperatives. The emotional cultures described in these essays enable comparative discussion about the history of emotions, and particularly the causes and consequences of emotional change in the larger cultural contexts of the Baroque and Enlightenment. Emotions research has enabled a rethinking of dominant narratives of the period—of histories of revolution, state-building, the rise of the public sphere, religious and scientific transformation, and more. As a new and dynamic field, the essays here provide a comprehensive introduction to a much bigger history of emotions.