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A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Modern and Post-Modern Age

A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Modern and Post-Modern Age, Volume 6

by Jane W. Davidson

Jane W. Davidson is Winthrop Professor of Muisc at the University of Western Australia and Deputy Director/Program Leader at the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of the Emotions. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Joy Damousi

Joy Damousi is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Melbourne. She was elected to the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2004 and to Council in 2016 and is currently the President. She is a member of the Academy's History Section, of which she was the Head 2008–11. She was also a member of the Academy's Awards Committee 2012-17. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781474207072
  • ISBN:
    978-1-4742-0707-2 (online)

    978-1-4725-3579-5 (hardback)

    978-1-4725-1506-3 (set)

    978-1-3500-9097-2 (epdf)

    978-1-3500-9098-9 (epub)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2019
A Cultural History of the Emotions in the Modern and Post-Modern Age
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The 20th century, with revolutionary and rapid developments in travel, communications and computerised technologies, offered new and seemingly limitless horizons which accompanied and amplified distinctive experiences of emotions. The birth of psychology and psychiatry revealed the importance of emotional life and that individuals could have control over their behaviour. Traditional religion was challenged and alternative forms of spiritualism emerged. Creative and performing arts continued to shape understandings and experiences of emotions, from realism to detachment, holistic to fragmented notions of self and society. The role of emotions in family life focused on how to deal with modern day freedom and anxiety. In the public sphere, people used emotion to oppress as well as liberate. Countering threats to national security, as well as personal and cultural identity, politically motivated activities emerged embracing peace, humanitarian, and environmental causes. This volume surveys the means by which the modern experience shaped how, why, and where emotions were expressed, monitored, and controlled.