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The Young Victims of the Nazi Regime

The Young Victims of the Nazi Regime: Migration, the Holocaust and Postwar Displacement

by Simone Gigliotti

Simone Gigliotti is Senior Lecturer in History at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She is the author of The Train Journey: Transit, Captivity, and Witnessing in the Holocaust (2009). Simone is also one of the co-editors of The Holocaust: A Reader (2005) and Ethics, Art and Representations of the Holocaust (2014). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Monica Tempian

Monica Tempian is Senior Lecturer in German at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2016
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781474219341
  • ISBN:
    978-1-4742-1934-1 (online)

    978-1-4725-3075-2 (hardback)

    978-1-4725-2711-0 (paperback)

    978-1-4725-2822-3 (epdf)

    978-1-4725-2390-7 (epub)
  • Edition:
    First published
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2017
The Young Victims of the Nazi Regime
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During the Nazi regime many children and young people in Europe found their lives uprooted by Nazi policies, resulting in their relocation around the globe. The Young Victims of the Nazi Regime represents the diversity of their experiences, covering a range of non-European perspectives on the Second World War and aspects of memory. This book is unique in that it places the experiences of children and youth in a transnational context, shifting the conversation of displacement and refuge to countries that have remained under-examined in a comparative context.

Featuring essays from an international range of experts, this book analyses the key themes in three sections: the migration of children to countries including England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Kenya, and Brazil; the experiences of young people who remained in Nazi Europe and became victims of war, displacement and deportation; and finally the challenges of rebuilding lives and representing traumas in the aftermath of war. In its comparisons between Jewish and non-Jewish experiences and how these intersected and diverged, it revisits debates about cultural genocide through the separation of families and communities, as well as contributing new perspectives on forced labour, families and the Holocaust, and Germans as war victims.