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Contemporary Readings of Crime Literature: ‘All this is not Imagination, but Matter of Fact’

Richard M. Ward

Richard M. Ward is Research Associate in History at the University of Sheffield, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Print Culture, Crime and Justice in Eighteenth-Century London

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book Chapter

...Which genres of crime literature did propertied Londoners of the eighteenth century read? How, in particular, did they read the genres which we are concerned with? What did they learn about crime upon the basis of this material? And in what...

Print Culture, Crime and Prosecution: Highway Robbery ‘Grows no Joke’

Richard M. Ward

Richard M. Ward is Research Associate in History at the University of Sheffield, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Print Culture, Crime and Justice in Eighteenth-Century London

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book Chapter

...In Georgian London every outbreak of war led to a fall in prosecutions at the Old Bailey for property theft while the return to peacetime produced a rapid increase in indictments. Indeed, in the immediate months leading up to,...

Early Modern Childbirth and Herbs – The Challenge of Finding the Sources

Critical Approaches to the History of Western Herbal Medicine

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book Chapter

...Introduction My initial research was undertaken with the aim of establishing which herbs early modern women used in childbirth. Herbs are little used in childbirth in England today and, as a medical herbalist and childbirth advisor, I...
...In 1821 the essayist and poet Charles Lamb discussed his relationship and residence with his sister, Mary, in mutually supportive terms that reflect how a shared investment in the running of the household and common interests or values...

A Trail of Scent: The Afterlife of Collections

Constance Classen

Constance Classen is Visiting Scholar at McGill University, Canada and director of an interdisciplinary project on art, museums, and the senses. She is the editor of The Book of Touch (Berg, 2005), and the author of, among other works, Worlds of Sense: Exploring the Senses in History and Across Cultures (1993) and The Color of Angels: Cosmology, Gender and the Aesthetic Imagination (1998), as well as The Deepest Sense: A Cultural History of Touch (2012). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Museum of the Senses : Experiencing Art and Collections

Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

Book Chapter

...Visitors to Knole, a country house in Kent, might notice an old-fashioned fragrance pervading the rooms. Long before hotels thought of branding themselves with signature scents, Knole had its own unique fragrance, emanating from bowls...

Agreements

A Cultural History of Law in the Age of Reform Volume 5

Bloomsbury Academic, 2019

Cultural History Chapter

...In the transition from the Enlightenment to the Age of Reform in Great Britain, the agreement between governors and those they govern underwent a significant transformation. The paradigm of the social contract that had dominated...

Home from home? Making life comfortable in the Victorian barracks

The Comforts of Home in Western Europe, 1700–1900

Bloomsbury Academic, 2020

Book Chapter

...A search of nineteenth-century newspapers in the British Newspaper Archives, using the term ‘Home Comforts’, elicits hundreds of articles and adverts describing this as being offered in places that are definitively not home...

The Big Shop Controversy

Mica Nava

Mica Nava is Emeritus Professor of Cultural Studies in the School of Arts and Digital Industries at the University of East London, UK. She is a cultural historian of British modernity and everyday race difference. Her publications include Gender and Generation (1984); Changing Cultures: Feminism, Youth and Consumerism (1992); Modern Times: A Century of English Modernity (1996); Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (1997) and Visceral Cosmopolitanism: Gender Culture and the Normalisation of Difference (2007). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Visceral Cosmopolitanism : Gender, Culture and the Normalisation of Difference

Berg, 2007

Book Chapter

...On 2 February 1912 the Daily News printed a letter signed by almost two hundred women workers employed by Selfridges, voicing their views on what had come to be known as the big shop controversy (Women Workers at Selfridges 1912...

The Biography of a National Meal

Kaori O’connor

Kaori O’Connor is an anthropologist at University College London (UCL), UK. Holding degrees in anthropology from Reed College, Oxford University and UCL, she has written widely on the anthropology of food, won the prestigious Sophie Coe Prize for Food History in 2009 and is a frequent media commentator. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The English Breakfast : The Biography of a National Meal with Recipes

Bloomsbury Academic, 2013

Book Chapter

...The English Breakfast is the best-known national meal in the world, a unique cultural and culinary symbol of England and Englishness, in edible form. As Countess Morphy (1936) put it: ‘Breakfast is the English meal par excellence. . .one...

Marked Bodies and Social Meanings

A Cultural History of the Human Body in the Age of Enlightenment Volume 4

Bloomsbury Academic, 2010

Cultural History Chapter

...Amid the announcements of deaths, auctions, elections, bankruptcies, and exhibitions, the newspapers of Enlightenment England advertised for missing persons.Morgan Auberry, a black down lookt Fellow, of a middle Stature, thick Lipt, black...