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  • Religion and Belief
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Inclusivity, Jews and the Eroticisation of Difference

Mica Nava

Mica Nava is Emeritus Professor of Cultural Studies in the School of Arts and Digital Industries at the University of East London, UK. She is a cultural historian of British modernity and everyday race difference. Her publications include Gender and Generation (1984); Changing Cultures: Feminism, Youth and Consumerism (1992); Modern Times: A Century of English Modernity (1996); Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (1997) and Visceral Cosmopolitanism: Gender Culture and the Normalisation of Difference (2007). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Visceral Cosmopolitanism : Gender, Culture and the Normalisation of Difference

Berg, 2007

Book Chapter

...Visceral Inclusivity Stanley Cohen’s impressive book States of Denial includes one small but significant section on altruism in which his concern is to explain why some people did help Jews escape from Nazis in occupied Europe during World...

Hearing

Mark M. Smith

Mark M. Smith is Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of several books, including Mastered by the Clock: Time, Slavery, and Freedom in the American South, which was co-winner of the Organization of American Historians’ 1997 Avery O. Craven Award and the South Carolina Historical Society’s Book of the Year. His work on sensory history has been featured in the New York Times. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Sensory History

Berg, 2007

Book Chapter

...Look, Hear: Listening In their attentiveness to the heard worlds of the past, many historians, myself included, have sometimes echoed the traditional hierarchy of the senses: quantitatively, historical work on hearing is second only to work...

Smelling

Mark M. Smith

Mark M. Smith is Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of several books, including Mastered by the Clock: Time, Slavery, and Freedom in the American South, which was co-winner of the Organization of American Historians’ 1997 Avery O. Craven Award and the South Carolina Historical Society’s Book of the Year. His work on sensory history has been featured in the New York Times. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Sensory History

Berg, 2007

Book Chapter

...Creating a Stink Historical writing on the history of smell, measured by quantity, has some way to go before it catches up with that on hearing. Given the importance of scent and smell to any number of societies throughout history...

Conclusion: Making the Future

Nicholas Campion

Nicholas Campion is Senior Lecturer in the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. He is director of the University’s Sophia Centre for the Study of Cosmology in Culture, and programme director of the MA in Cultural Astronomy and Astrology. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The New Age in the Modern West : Counterculture, Utopia and Prophecy from the late Eighteenth Century to the Present Day

Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

Book Chapter

...The belief that history has a direction and a purpose is remarkably persistent. This should not be surprising, for human beings spend much of their lives searching for meaning. Some say that we cannot function effectively without a sense...

Embodying Otherness in Contemporary Interiors of Modern Yoga

Oriental Interiors: Design, Identity, Space

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book Chapter

...In an article entitled “The Most Beautiful Yoga Studios in New York City” from January 2012, online magazine Well&Good NYC outlines the parameters that define a “pretty” yoga studio—something, the authors claim, that is undeniably important...

From Pietism to Enlightenment 1700–1800

Gerald Stone

Gerald Stone FBA is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, UK. He is the author of The Smallest Slavonic Nation: The Sorbs of Lusatia and numerous other books and articles on aspects of the language and culture of the Wends, Sorbs and Kashubs, including an Upper Sorbian-English Dictionary. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Slav Outposts in Central European History : The Wends, Sorbs and Kashubs

Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

Book Chapter

...In 1709 Friedrich I (king in Prussia) gave support to the publication of a Wendish New Testament. His successor Friedrich Wilhelm looked on the Wends as mere cannon-fodder. He founded a separate Wendish Regiment for them and introduced...

Popular Beliefs about the Human Body

A Cultural History of the Human Body in the Medieval Age Volume 2

Bloomsbury Academic, 2010

Cultural History Chapter

...In the Middle Ages, the human body was understood to exist within a complex web of interior and exterior influences that acted on and affected it in various crucial ways. From the twelfth century on, medieval medicine and natural...

Arguments

A Cultural History of Law in the Middle Ages Volume 2

Bloomsbury Academic, 2019

Cultural History Chapter

...The tendency to apply procedural arguments to extralegal situations is much more widespread than one might think. In the Middle Ages, this tendency incorporated different fields of knowledge in a much more casual and transversal way than...

Religion and Popular Beliefs

A Cultural History of Women in the Modern Age Volume 6

Bloomsbury Academic, 2013

Cultural History Chapter

...The twentieth century was thought of, for a time, as an increasingly secular century. Claims that “God Is Dead” signaled the belief that Western society was becoming increasingly indifferent towards religion.There is a “death of God...

Body and Soul

A Cultural History of Food in the Age of Empire Volume 5

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Cultural History Chapter

...The dichotomy of body and soul permeates much of the history of philosophy. There is no one way to approach and account for this tension. The history of food generally eschews the very notion, and the relation between food, body, and soul...